Instagram user @healthyhappydays_ was happy with her results, though. "I found it easy to stick to as it's only three days," she told us. "You know you're going to see results if you [are] 100% committed to it... If you're feeling bloated, especially after a big weekend or event, it's a good diet to do to get back to shape in a short space of time. That's the reason why I did it after being indulgent over [the holidays]." Because she typically sticks to a vegetarian or vegan diet, she substituted out two veggie sausages instead of the hot dogs and the meat.

Boredom is dangerous and so easily leads to weight gain. While free time gets perceived as relaxing, it actually makes me feel anxious, which can lead to bad eating habits. My busiest days are the ones when I tend to focus less on my food and more on what I need to get done. That's why I always try to fill my schedule with things that make me feel productive—so I don’t find myself rummaging through the pantry for a lack of something to do.
Details of fasting practices differ. Eastern Orthodox Christians fast during specified fasting seasons of the year, which include not only the better-known Great Lent, but also fasts on every Wednesday and Friday (except on special holidays), together with extended fasting periods before Christmas (the Nativity Fast), after Easter (the Apostles Fast) and in early August (the Dormition Fast). Members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons) generally fast for 24 hours on the first Sunday of each month. Like Muslims, they refrain from all drinking and eating unless they are children or are physically unable to fast. Fasting is also a feature of ascetic traditions in religions such as Hinduism and Buddhism. Mahayana traditions that follow the Brahma's Net Sutra may recommend that the laity fast "during the six days of fasting each month and the three months of fasting each year" [Brahma's Net Sutra, minor precept 30]. Members of the Baha'i Faith observe a Nineteen Day Fast from sunrise to sunset during March each year.
Josh Axe, a doctor of natural medicine and clinical nutritionist, estimates that about 25% of people who try a ketogenic diet experience these symptoms, with fatigue being the most common. “That happens because your body runs out of sugar to burn for energy, and it has to start using fat,” he says. “That transition alone is enough to make your body feel tired for a few days.”
It's important to note that liquids are also restricted on the diet, and water and herbal teas are the only approved beverages, explains registered dietician Beth Warren. It's okay to drink coffee on the first day—but sugar, creamers, and artificial sweeteners are off limits, meaning you'll only be able to use stevia in your coffee (if needed). Alcohol, however, is definitely off limits, especially since wine and beer tend to contain a lot of calories, says Virgin.
She also says that cutting certain foods and drinks out of your diet point-blank, like soda, can be difficult. "While I’m no fan of sodas — they’ve have been linked to weight gain, and have no nutritional value — banning them without offering a substitute might backfire because people feel deprived. Deprivation can lead to rebellion and giving up on weight loss." Sticking to the meal plan is the hard part — but if you can do, you will lose a couple of pounds, the professor says. "If you actually follow it... then yes, you’ll certainly lose weight. You’re not going to lose 10 pounds of 'real weight' in 3 days though. If you lose 10 pounds, then most of it is water weight."
First things first: your stomach is made up of good and bad bacteria, which scientists like to call microbiota or gut flora. And it's important that you keep it in check, as if you were keeping a seesaw level. "Microbiota is considered the body's garden, and it has a controlling influence over a lot of important bodily functions, including metabolism," says Gerry Mullin, M.D., author of The Gut Balance Revolution. Studies show that a diet full of fat and refined carbs (think white bread and potatoes) and low in fiber (fruit, vegetables, beans and oats) disrupt the balance, and the seesaw starts to tip in favor of weight retention and fat accumulation. 
Water is the best thing you can drink on the Military Diet. So drink as much as you can! Artificial sweeteners aren’t good for you or your blood sugar, so try to avoid them. The only artificial sweetener we recommend on the Military Diet is Stevia (in your coffee). You can also drink as much caffeine free herbal tea as you want on the diet, but again, only use Stevia as a sweetener.
Boredom is dangerous and so easily leads to weight gain. While free time gets perceived as relaxing, it actually makes me feel anxious, which can lead to bad eating habits. My busiest days are the ones when I tend to focus less on my food and more on what I need to get done. That's why I always try to fill my schedule with things that make me feel productive—so I don’t find myself rummaging through the pantry for a lack of something to do.
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