Who actually created this diet? I can’t find any data on its development, much less any studies on its effectiveness or healthfulness. All of this supports my initial gut instinct that this diet has zero backing in science and health. Also, this diet appears to masquerade under several different names, the Cardiac Diet being one. Search both Cardiac and Military diets, and you’ll find the exact same three-day menu and protocol, although the Cardiac Diet is suggested to be a diet that physicians prescribe to obese patients for quick weight loss.
I will continue to eat this way because I feel and look healthier. I also noticed a reduction in the inflammation from the osteoarthritis in my spine. I don't eat sugar or sweets of any kind, and keep my carbs below 20 or 25 grams a day. I don't drive myself crazy anymore tracking macros or compulsively counting calories. Between protein and fat, getting enough fat was more of a challenge for me. I eat lots of Kerry Gold butter, Coconut oil, heavy cream, olive oil and lots of avocados. I occasionally use MCT oil.
The ketogenic diet achieved national media exposure in the US in October 1994, when NBC's Dateline television programme reported the case of Charlie Abrahams, son of Hollywood producer Jim Abrahams. The two-year-old suffered from epilepsy that had remained uncontrolled by mainstream and alternative therapies. Abrahams discovered a reference to the ketogenic diet in an epilepsy guide for parents and brought Charlie to John M. Freeman at Johns Hopkins Hospital, which had continued to offer the therapy. Under the diet, Charlie's epilepsy was rapidly controlled and his developmental progress resumed. This inspired Abrahams to create the Charlie Foundation to promote the diet and fund research.[10] A multicentre prospective study began in 1994, the results were presented to the American Epilepsy Society in 1996 and were published[17] in 1998. There followed an explosion of scientific interest in the diet. In 1997, Abrahams produced a TV movie, ...First Do No Harm, starring Meryl Streep, in which a young boy's intractable epilepsy is successfully treated by the ketogenic diet.[1]
Science is quite clear that excess weight carries considerable health risks, including a higher risk for heart attack, stroke, and diabetes. Yet where that weight accumulates may pose the greatest threat. A large waist size suggests excess visceral (belly) fat, which is stored in the abdominal cavity and surrounds vital organs like the pancreas, liver, and intestines. It poses an increased heart attack risk because of its association with high blood pressure, elevated blood sugars and abnormal lipid levels. (Locked) More »
Breakfast on day 1 includes grapefruit, toast, peanut butter and coffee or tea. There are a range of important vitamins and minerals present in this meal.  Starting out with the grapefruit, you’ll get 28% of the Vitamin A and over half of your Vitamin C requirements for the day, all with just a half a grapefruit! Vitamin A is vital because it helps the body in a number of areas including vision, promoting healthy skin and mucous membranes, the immune system and bone/ tooth growth. The Vitamin C is equally important. Although it may stop short of curing the common cold, this vitamin does support your immune system and helps your body to absorb iron. Grapefruit packs in the nutritional value and also contains Vitamin B-6, potassium and plenty of fiber. Vitamin B-6 is important for protein metabolism and is also indispensable in forming new red blood cells (1), while potassium helps to maintain fluid balance in the body, supports nerve transmission and acts in muscle contractions as well (2). Finally, fiber is what keeps your digestive system moving and is essential in any diet; especially one focused on weight loss.

With this eating style, you’re looking at a lot of menu planning and preparation. A review published in August 2017 in Nutrients suggests the diet could lead to weight loss, but the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics warns the plan could also cause certain nutrient deficiencies, such as in calcium and vitamin D. (3,4) And, therefore, according to an article published in the January–February 2016 issue of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners, anyone at risk for osteoporosis should avoid it. (5)

Do 20-30 minutes of weight training. You don’t need equipment to get started. Instead, use bodyweight exercises while you’re getting used to the idea. If you already have a gym membership or equipment at home, however, you can certainly make use of the weights. Need advice for working on strength training? You can learn more about strength training here.


Now that you’ve read through the reviews and testimonials; you’ll realize that a few people actually report losing 10 pounds! Most people report losing weight in the 4-7 pound range. However, if they continue to lose weight on the 4 days off, they could feasibly reach the 10 pounds in a week goal. The short answer to the question “Can you really lose 10 pounds in a week?” is yes. But, as you probably guessed, there’s more.
Lunch on day 1 is packed with protein, fulfilling about 60% of your daily protein intake requirements just in the tuna. The tuna also contributes other vitamins including Vitamin A, B-12, B-6 and minerals including magnesium and iron. Vitamin B-12 is an important vitamin often found in fish that plays an important role in the creation of new cells. It’s also important for nerve function. (1) The bread offers carbohydrates and plenty of fiber.

You can do both types of exercise for each of the three days, or just one of them. Then, when you’re on your 4 days off the diet, you can do both cardio and weight training, or perhaps lengthen the time you do either one of them by up to 45-60 minutes. You can also alternate days- doing cardio one day and strength training the next. This way you get the benefits of each, but only focus on one at a time.

When the body is expending more energy than it is consuming (e.g. when exercising), the body's cells rely on internally stored energy sources, such as complex carbohydrates and fats, for energy. The first source to which the body turns is glycogen (by glycogenolysis). Glycogen is a complex carbohydrate, 65% of which is stored in skeletal muscles and the remainder in the liver (totaling about 2,000 kcal in the whole body). It is created from the excess of ingested macronutrients, mainly carbohydrates. When glycogen is nearly depleted, the body begins lipolysis, the mobilization and catabolism of fat stores for energy. In this process, fats, obtained from adipose tissue, or fat cells, are broken down into glycerol and fatty acids, which can be used to generate energy.[25] The primary by-products of metabolism are carbon dioxide and water; carbon dioxide is expelled through the respiratory system.
You'd think it makes sense: if you have too much belly fat, do a lot of core work to make it go away. But Sylwia Wiesenberg, founder of Tonique Fitness, says it's counterproductive. "If you have extra belly fat, you'll never see the muscles you're working underneath," she explains. "Instead, focus on building a strong lower body—the largest muscle group, and therefore most calorie burning—which will help keep your metabolism humming long after." Then, when you are ready for abs work, do it standing up. A review of core training by the American College of Sports Medicine found that it's a more effective way to tone than traditional exercises that have you on the floor.
A study published in American Psychologist found that short-term dieting involving "severe restriction of calorie intake" does not lead to "sustained improvements in weight and health for the majority of individuals".[4] Other studies have found that the average individual maintains some weight loss after dieting.[5] Weight loss by dieting, while of benefit to those classified as unhealthy, may slightly increase the mortality rate for individuals who are otherwise healthy.[6][7][8]
Intentional weight loss is the loss of total body mass as a result of efforts to improve fitness and health, or to change appearance through slimming. Weight loss in individuals who are overweight or obese can reduce health risks,[1] increase fitness,[2] and may delay the onset of diabetes.[1] It could reduce pain and increase movement in people with osteoarthritis of the knee.[2] Weight loss can lead to a reduction in hypertension (high blood pressure), however whether this reduces hypertension-related harm is unclear.[1][not in citation given]
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