The benefits above are the most common ones. But there are others that are potentially even more surprising and – at least for some people – life changing. Did you know that a keto diet can help treat high blood pressure, may result in less acne, may help control migraine, might help with certain mental health issues and could have a few other potential benefits?
Don’t buy your tickets to Bonnaroo just yet; the kind of acid that will help you slim down is the stuff right inside your cabinet. A 12-week study published in Bioscience, Biotechnology, and Biochemistry reveals that obese study subjects who made vinegar part of their diet dropped more belly fat than a control group, and other research suggests that acidic foods, like vinegar, can increase the human carbohydrate metabolism by as much as 40 percent.
If you’ve got weight to lose and you want it gone fast, try swapping out your usual proteins in favor of fish. Not only is fish lower in calories than an equivalent amount of beef or chicken, a study published in Obesity reveals study subjects who added omega-3 fatty acids, like those found in fish, to their diets shed more weight and had an easier time keeping it off than those who skipped them.
First things first: your stomach is made up of good and bad bacteria, which scientists like to call microbiota or gut flora. And it's important that you keep it in check, as if you were keeping a seesaw level. "Microbiota is considered the body's garden, and it has a controlling influence over a lot of important bodily functions, including metabolism," says Gerry Mullin, M.D., author of The Gut Balance Revolution. Studies show that a diet full of fat and refined carbs (think white bread and potatoes) and low in fiber (fruit, vegetables, beans and oats) disrupt the balance, and the seesaw starts to tip in favor of weight retention and fat accumulation. 
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