No. Alcoholic drinks are high in calories. Save your cocktail for when you’re off the diet, or on the 4 days off. Even when you’re not on the diet, if you’re interested in maintaining your weight, you should avoid certain types of alcohol. For example, steer clear of sugary alcoholic drinks such as long island iced teas and margaritas. The sugar adds in a lot of calories that will promote weight gain. Instead, go for a gin and tonic or vodka with soda water and lime. Red wine is also a great choice. You should also try to lay off beer if you’re hoping to maintain or lose weight. If you’re really craving a beer, go for a dark beer like Guinness which is rich in antioxidants.
A fat-burning superfood, grapefruit contains a compound that can lower the fat-storage hormone insulin, which in turn can lead to weight loss. In fact, eating half a grapefruit before each meal could help you lose up to a pound a week—even if you don't change anything else about your diet. Because grapefruits are 90% water, which fills you up, they also act as a natural appetite suppressant.
Ultimately, you need to pick a healthy eating plan you can stick to, Stewart says. The benefit of a low-carb approach is that it simply involves learning better food choices—no calorie-counting is necessary. In general, a low-carb way of eating shifts your intake away from problem foods—those high in carbs and sugar and without much fiber, like bread, bagels and sodas—and toward high-fiber or high-protein choices, like vegetables, beans and healthy meats.

Perhaps the biggest benefit of this type of diet is the potential for weight loss, given that currently over 70 percent of the United States population is either overweight or obese, according to the NIDDK. The NIDDK reports that people who initially lost 15 to 25 percent of their body weight within six months might be able to maintain a 5 percent weight loss over a period of four years. (2) The catch here is that exercise and permanent lifestyle changes must be made for such effects to stick — and there’s no evidence the military diet leads to sustainable healthy habits that result in maintainable weight loss.
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