When you substitute foods, make sure you don’t use the same amount of the substitute as the original without checking caloric equivalence first. For example, if you want to substitute Greek yogurt for cottage cheese, you can actually eat a bit more of the yogurt than the prescribed amount of cottage cheese. Just 1 cup of 2% cottage cheese contains 194 calories, while 1 cup of 2% Greek yogurt contains 150 calories, meaning you can have additional 1/3 cup of the yogurt. Make use of a calorie calculator if you’re not sure about your allowances.   
^ Ketogenic "eggnog" is used during induction and is a drink with the required ketogenic ratio. For example, a 4:1 ratio eggnog would contain 60 g of 36% heavy whipping cream, 25 g pasteurised raw egg, saccharin and vanilla flavour. This contains 245 kcal (1,025 kJ), 4 g protein, 2 g carbohydrate and 24 g fat (24:6 = 4:1).[17] The eggnog may also be cooked to make a custard, or frozen to make ice cream.[36]
I would love to see a health professional’s list of substitutes for this diet! Is there by chance a vegetarian, vegan, or gluten-free version? I understand the importance of following it strictly due to the scientific research behind the given foods, but I think it would be interesting to see a follow-up article or link to another publication that discusses what you can also use in the military diet.
Boredom is dangerous and so easily leads to weight gain. While free time gets perceived as relaxing, it actually makes me feel anxious, which can lead to bad eating habits. My busiest days are the ones when I tend to focus less on my food and more on what I need to get done. That's why I always try to fill my schedule with things that make me feel productive—so I don’t find myself rummaging through the pantry for a lack of something to do.
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