Day two is even lighter fare. For breakfast, have one slice of whole-wheat toast, one egg cooked however you like, and half a banana. Lunch is one cup of cottage cheese, one hard-boiled egg, and five (yep, count 'em out) saltine crackers. Dinner features two hot dogs (just the hot dogs themselves, no buns or condiments), one cup of broccoli, a half cup of carrots, half a banana, and one half cup of vanilla ice cream.
The Scottish military surgeon, John Rollo, published Notes of a Diabetic Case in 1797. It described the benefits of a meat diet for those suffering from diabetes, basing this recommendation on Matthew Dobson's discovery of glycosuria in diabetes mellitus.[11] By means of Dobson's testing procedure (for glucose in the urine) Rollo worked out a diet that had success for what is now called type 2 diabetes.[12]
We weren't joking when we said gut flora was important—when it's out of whack, the way your body breaks down calories is also impacted and it's all to do with two kinds of fat cells: white and brown. The white ones cause obesity and insulin resistance when there are too many hanging around, and insulin resistance makes it super difficult to burn fat despite working out like a #boss. Brown fat cells, on the other hand, protect the body against excess weight, and the more you have, the more calories you can burn. So the goal is to have white fat cells turn into brown ones as often as possible. That happens when your gut flora is in check (with that balanced diet we talked about above), you exercise, and get enough sleep, as melatonin cues up the production of brown fat cells. 
All beans are high in fiber, which is your friend when you're trying to lose weight because it helps you feel fuller longer, thus controlling hunger. Eating beans and legumes has also been linked with various other health benefits, including lowering blood pressure, reducing LDL cholesterol and reducing risk of cardiovascular disease. Beans are fairly low in calories and deliver protein as well. Try them in homemade veggie burgers, soups and salads.
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