"There is promising research on effective weight loss from intermittent fasting, an eating strategy where you eat very few calories two days per week while eating higher calorie levels the remainder of the week. However, this form of eating involves careful planning to ensure every calorie consumed on ‘fasting’ days is nutritionally dense. I would encourage someone interested in the Military Diet to consider this weight loss strategy before following this diet plan. Fad diets don’t work — whatever you do to lose weight has to be something you can see yourself following for life. If it is too restrictive, you will just regain the weight."


The original therapeutic diet for paediatric epilepsy provides just enough protein for body growth and repair, and sufficient calories[Note 1] to maintain the correct weight for age and height. The classic therapeutic ketogenic diet was developed for treatment of paediatric epilepsy in the 1920s and was widely used into the next decade, but its popularity waned with the introduction of effective anticonvulsant medications. This classic ketogenic diet contains a 4:1 ratio by weight of fat to combined protein and carbohydrate. This is achieved by excluding high-carbohydrate foods such as starchy fruits and vegetables, bread, pasta, grains and sugar, while increasing the consumption of foods high in fat such as nuts, cream, and butter.[1] Most dietary fat is made of molecules called long-chain triglycerides (LCTs). However, medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs)—made from fatty acids with shorter carbon chains than LCTs—are more ketogenic. A variant of the classic diet known as the MCT ketogenic diet uses a form of coconut oil, which is rich in MCTs, to provide around half the calories. As less overall fat is needed in this variant of the diet, a greater proportion of carbohydrate and protein can be consumed, allowing a greater variety of food choices.[4][5]
If you’re looking for a quick fix to fit into a dress, say, for your daughter’s wedding, then this diet could be a good fit for you. And if you simply can't give up ice cream, the military diet shows how you can work it into your meal plan without overdoing it. But if you’re looking to make long-term lifestyle changes, you might be more interested in something like the Mediterranean diet or the anti-inflammatory diet.
Overall, the military diet is a pretty low-calorie plan, considering dieters are encouraged to consume approximately 1,400 calories on day one, 1,200 calories on day two, and roughly 1,100 calories on day three, explains JJ Virgin, a board-certified nutrition specialist. (Here's what you need really to know about counting calories.) The foods on the plan are supposedly  "chemically compatible," she says, and are said to work together in order to promote fast weight loss. When you are on the diet you are supposed to follow it for three days in one week, she adds.
Erin Palinski-Wade, RD, CDE, and author of 2 Day Diabetes Diet and Belly Fat Diet For Dummies, feels similarly concerned. "A restrictive diet that does not promote the nutritional value of foods and is only focused on calories, such as the Military Diet, may promote weight loss at the expense of health," she says. "This diet is not sustainable and any weight loss will most likely be regained quickly." She even cautions that the diet may ultimately lead to weight gain down the road. "A drastic reduction in calories will promote weight loss, however restricting calories this low may promote a loss of both lean body mass (muscle mass) as well as fat mass, which makes it easier to regain the weight as soon as you return to normal eating habits."
Picture this: You're out for a run when, all of a sudden, you twist your ankle. Next thing you know you're in pain, there's swelling, and even some redness. That's inflammation as we know it. The same thing happens when the inside of our body gets an injury. "Inflammation is a vital part of our immune response; it's the body's way of healing and defending itself against bacteria and viruses," says Tali Pines, M.S., a registered dietician in New York City. The problem is when it becomes chronic, as it can disrupt metabolism-regulating hormones, causing weight gain and disease. 
Because the Military Diet discourages substitutions, some may be led to believe that specific food choices have a “magical” effect to enhance weight loss. The truth is, there’s nothing special or unique about the combination of these foods over the three-day period. In fact, choosing different foods with similar macronutrient profiles would provide the exact results.
Listen to your mum - dieting is faddish. Instead, improve the "quite" to "all" healthy and eat only nutritionally balanced, healthy foods. Cut out all sweets and junk foods, apart from an occasional treat, as humans would have always done till recent times. The exercise is important, and include plenty of stealth exercise, such as taking the stairs instead of the elevator and cycling to the shops instead of driving, etc.
Belly fat is something that makes you look really bad and it is also very unhealthy. A sedentary lifestyle and wrong food choices are responsible for belly fat. However, not to worry, you can always do some core strengthening exercises to get the desired washboard abs. Here are some expert tips to show you the way to shed those extra pounds from your belly.
In Asia, the normal diet includes rice and noodles as the main energy source, making their elimination difficult. Therefore, the MCT-oil form of the diet, which allows more carbohydrate, has proved useful. In India, religious beliefs commonly affect the diet: some patients are vegetarians, will not eat root vegetables or avoid beef. The Indian ketogenic diet is started without a fast due to cultural opposition towards fasting in children. The low-fat, high-carbohydrate nature of the normal Indian and Asian diet means that their ketogenic diets typically have a lower ketogenic ratio (1:1) than in America and Europe. However, they appear to be just as effective.[53]
Ilana Muhlstein, M.S., R.D.N., is the co-creator of Beachbody’s 2B Mindset program. She earned a Bachelor of Science degree in nutrition and dietetics from the University of Maryland, sits on the executive leadership team for the American Heart Association, and leads the Bruin Health Improvement Program at UCLA. Ilana acts as a nutrition consultant for several companies, including Beachbody and Whole Foods Market. At home, she is a wife and mother of two.
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