Limiting your daily intake of fruits and vegetables, means you're likely not getting the amount of fiber, antioxidant vitamins A and C, potassium, and phytonutrients you need on a daily basis, she says. Since the diet also includes limited dairy, you'll likely be low on vitamin D, calcium, and potassium too—nutrients that most Americans are already lacking, says Amidor. Since the diet is super low-carb, you're not getting enough whole grains, either—which are a great source of B vitamins and fiber, she says. (See: Why Healthy Carbs Belong In Your Diet.)
A keto diet has shown to improve triglyceride levels and cholesterol levels most associated with arterial buildup. More specifically low-carb, high-fat diets show a dramatic increase in HDL and decrease in LDL particle concentration compared to low-fat diets.3A study in the long-term effects of a ketogenic diet shows a significant reduction in cholesterol levels, body weight, and blood glucose. Read more on keto and cholesterol >
"When going out for fast food, I used to get the large-size value meal. Now, I satisfy a craving by ordering just one item: a small order of fries or a six-piece box of chicken nuggets. So far, I've shaved off 16 pounds in seven weeks, and I'm on track to being thinner than my high school self for my 10-year reunion later this year." —Miranda Jarrell, Birmingham, AL
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