I would love to see a health professional’s list of substitutes for this diet! Is there by chance a vegetarian, vegan, or gluten-free version? I understand the importance of following it strictly due to the scientific research behind the given foods, but I think it would be interesting to see a follow-up article or link to another publication that discusses what you can also use in the military diet.
The diet claims to be “one of the best natural diets.” They recommend that dieters avoid artificial sweeteners because they “aren’t good for you.” But then the site goes on to include foods like hot dogs and crackers in the daily meal plans. These are foods that are heavily processed and contain ingredients that have been associated with an increased risk of cancer and heart disease.
Weight loss occurs when the body is expending more energy in work and metabolism than it is absorbing from food or other nutrients. It will then use stored reserves from fat or muscle, gradually leading to weight loss. For athletes seeking to improve performance or to meet required weight classification for participation in a sport, it is not uncommon to seek additional weight loss even if they are already at their ideal body weight. Others may be driven to lose weight to achieve an appearance they consider more attractive. However, being underweight is associated with health risks such as difficulty fighting off infection, osteoporosis, decreased muscle strength, trouble regulating body temperature and even increased risk of death.[3]
Although many hypotheses have been put forward to explain how the ketogenic diet works, it remains a mystery. Disproven hypotheses include systemic acidosis (high levels of acid in the blood), electrolyte changes and hypoglycaemia (low blood glucose).[18] Although many biochemical changes are known to occur in the brain of a patient on the ketogenic diet, it is not known which of these has an anticonvulsant effect. The lack of understanding in this area is similar to the situation with many anticonvulsant drugs.[55]

This diet was amazing for me. I lost over 10 pounds! I followed the diet and did hot yoga. Although there is the occasional review where users of the 3 Day Military Diet claim they haven’t lost any weight at all, the majority lose at least a few pounds. Considering that on average by following a healthy diet and exercising it’s normal to lose about 1 pound a week, the 3 Day Military Diet really speeds up weight loss. People also generally report that restricting themselves for 3 days is much easier than watching their diet over a much longer period of time. Overall, the consensus of those who’ve tried the diet is very positive.


Belly fat is is different from fat elsewhere in your body. The extra weight some people carry around their waists, arms, and love handles isn’t the same — that’s subcutaneous fat, which sits beneath the skin and is relatively harmless, according to Harvard Medical School. The stuff in your belly, visceral fat, lodges deeper down, around your abdominal organs. It's metabolically active tissue that actually functions like a separate organ, releasing substances into the rest of your body that, in excess, can increase your risk of disease.
Picture this: You're out for a run when, all of a sudden, you twist your ankle. Next thing you know you're in pain, there's swelling, and even some redness. That's inflammation as we know it. The same thing happens when the inside of our body gets an injury. "Inflammation is a vital part of our immune response; it's the body's way of healing and defending itself against bacteria and viruses," says Tali Pines, M.S., a registered dietician in New York City. The problem is when it becomes chronic, as it can disrupt metabolism-regulating hormones, causing weight gain and disease. 

Very low calorie diets provide 200–800 calories per day, maintaining protein intake but limiting calories from both fat and carbohydrates. They subject the body to starvation and produce an average loss of 1.5–2.5 kg (3.3–5.5 lb) per week. "2-4-6-8", a popular diet of this variety, follows a four-day cycle in which only 200 calories are consumed the first day, 400 the second day, 600 the third day, 800 the fourth day, and then totally fasting, after which the cycle repeats. These diets are not recommended for general use as they are associated with adverse side effects such as loss of lean muscle mass, increased risks of gout, and electrolyte imbalances. People attempting these diets must be monitored closely by a physician to prevent complications.[1]


Very low calorie diets provide 200–800 calories per day, maintaining protein intake but limiting calories from both fat and carbohydrates. They subject the body to starvation and produce an average loss of 1.5–2.5 kg (3.3–5.5 lb) per week. "2-4-6-8", a popular diet of this variety, follows a four-day cycle in which only 200 calories are consumed the first day, 400 the second day, 600 the third day, 800 the fourth day, and then totally fasting, after which the cycle repeats. These diets are not recommended for general use as they are associated with adverse side effects such as loss of lean muscle mass, increased risks of gout, and electrolyte imbalances. People attempting these diets must be monitored closely by a physician to prevent complications.[1]
If you’ve decided to move forward in trying the keto diet, you will want to stick to the parameters of the eating plan. Roughly 60 to 80 percent of your calories will come from fats. That means you’ll eat meats, fats, and oils, and a very limited amount of nonstarchy vegetables, she says. (This is different from a traditional low-carb diet, as even fewer carbs are allowed on the keto diet.)
There’s one thing to like about visceral fat: It yields fairly easily to aerobic exercise. Vaporizing calories via running, biking, swimming—anything that gets your heart rate up—is an effective way to whittle your middle. In fact, one 2011 study from Duke University Medical Center, published in the American Journal of Physiology, found the sweet spot: Jogging the equivalent of 12 miles a week was even more effective in reducing visceral fat than resistance training three times per week. However, both types of exercise were beneficial when it came to belly fat, the researchers say. (Don’t have time to hit the gym? Try these fun at-home cardio workouts if you’re in a pinch.)
Do you even lift, bro? If you’re serious about getting rid of that belly fat fast, resistance training might just be the key. A study from the Harvard School of Public Health found that adding weight training to adult male test subjects’ workouts significantly reduced their risk of abdominal obesity over a multi-year study period, although doing the same amount of cardio had no such effect. Research from the University of Maryland even found that just 16 weeks of weight training boosted study participants’ metabolic rates by a whopping 7.7 percent, making it easier to ditch those extra inches around your middle.
Continuing weight loss may deteriorate into wasting, a vaguely defined condition called cachexia.[31] Cachexia differs from starvation in part because it involves a systemic inflammatory response.[31] It is associated with poorer outcomes.[26][31][32] In the advanced stages of progressive disease, metabolism can change so that they lose weight even when they are getting what is normally regarded as adequate nutrition and the body cannot compensate. This leads to a condition called anorexia cachexia syndrome (ACS) and additional nutrition or supplementation is unlikely to help.[28] Symptoms of weight loss from ACS include severe weight loss from muscle rather than body fat, loss of appetite and feeling full after eating small amounts, nausea, anemia, weakness and fatigue.[28]
In the UK, up to 5% of the general population is underweight, but more than 10% of those with lung or gastrointestinal diseases and who have recently had surgery.[30] According to data in the UK using the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool ('MUST'), which incorporates unintentional weight loss, more than 10% of the population over the age of 65 is at risk of malnutrition.[30] A high proportion (10-60%) of hospital patients are also at risk, along with a similar proportion in care homes.[30]
This is quite a strange article because it basically says that the 3-day-military diet is not good, which I agree with. It seems that the cons of the diet far outweigh the pros. Nevertheless, the fact that it is 3 days only is a good thing since following it for any longer is undoubtedly bad for your health. The possible side effects also sound pretty terrible. The author’s overall conclusions are very sensible and should be followed.
So, how can you lose more than 3 pounds then? Well our bodies are more complex than simple calorie-counting would have you believe. Each person’s metabolism is different and reacts differently to the diet. Many people burn more than 2000 calories in a day, just through their regular activities, which would mean you’d lose more weight. It’s also possible that you typically consume more than 2000 calories in a day- making the effects of the diet even more dramatic.
“Intermittent fasting can be really challenging if you have an ever-changing schedule,” adds Hultin. “If you're traveling and crossing time zones, it could be very difficult to follow. It might be best for people with more stability in their lives.” Intermittent fasting isn’t safe for people with type 2 diabetes, children, pregnant or lactating women, or anyone with a history of an eating disorder.
You don’t have to be the next Usain Bolt in the making to enjoy some serious belly-slimming results from hitting the track from time to time. Even a moderate-rate jog a few times a week can blast through that belly fat; in fact, a study conducted at Duke University Medical Center found that, over the course of an eight-month study, overweight adult study subjects who jogged 12 miles a week lost the most belly fat and burned 67 percent more calories than participants who did an equivalent amount of resistance exercise, or a combination of cardio and resistance work.

^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s Kossoff EH, Zupec-Kania BA, Amark PE, Ballaban-Gil KR, Bergqvist AG, Blackford R, et al. Optimal clinical management of children receiving the ketogenic diet: recommendations of the International Ketogenic Diet Study Group. Epilepsia. 2009 Feb;50(2):304–17. doi:10.1111/j.1528-1167.2008.01765.x. PMID 18823325

There are no surprises on the menu for the military diet. “The diet is a combination of low-calorie, chemically compatible foods designed to work together and jump-start your weight loss,” according to TheMilitaryDiet.com. The rigid three-day diet includes foods like grapefruit, toast, eggs, crackers, two tablespoons of peanut butter, cottage cheese, specific fruits and vegetables, and coffee (water is highly recommended, too). The menu does allow either a cup (days 1 and 3) or a half-cup (day 2) of vanilla ice cream at dinner.
As you’re planning your exercise routine- try to keep it varied. Why? A mix of cardio and strength training is best, both for burning calories and building muscle. Unfortunately, many people only focus on cardio, which is a start, but including strength training will make you appear even slimmer as the pounds drop off. In addition, muscle burns more calories than fat when you’re at rest, which means that in the long-term you’ll burn even more calories.
Day two is even lighter fare. For breakfast, have one slice of whole-wheat toast, one egg cooked however you like, and half a banana. Lunch is one cup of cottage cheese, one hard-boiled egg, and five (yep, count 'em out) saltine crackers. Dinner features two hot dogs (just the hot dogs themselves, no buns or condiments), one cup of broccoli, a half cup of carrots, half a banana, and one half cup of vanilla ice cream.

Remember that it takes a 3500-calorie deficit to lose one pound of fat. That is, you have to either burn off 3500 calories through exercise or eat 3500 calories less than you burn in a week. Break this up into daily limits. To burn 3500 calories a week, you should aim to have a 500 calorie deficit every day. For example, you can exercise to burn 250 calories and cut 250 calories from your diet.
Do you even lift, bro? If you’re serious about getting rid of that belly fat fast, resistance training might just be the key. A study from the Harvard School of Public Health found that adding weight training to adult male test subjects’ workouts significantly reduced their risk of abdominal obesity over a multi-year study period, although doing the same amount of cardio had no such effect. Research from the University of Maryland even found that just 16 weeks of weight training boosted study participants’ metabolic rates by a whopping 7.7 percent, making it easier to ditch those extra inches around your middle.
The military diet is an increasingly popular fad diet for fast weight loss—and if you adhere to it, you likely will lose some weight quickly. Supporters of the military diet claim you’ll take off “up to 10 pounds” in seven days. By contrast, most nutritionists recommend a maximum weight loss of 10 pounds over the course of a month. Yup—the military diet is essentially a crash diet.

"When going out for fast food, I used to get the large-size value meal. Now, I satisfy a craving by ordering just one item: a small order of fries or a six-piece box of chicken nuggets. So far, I've shaved off 16 pounds in seven weeks, and I'm on track to being thinner than my high school self for my 10-year reunion later this year." —Miranda Jarrell, Birmingham, AL
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