In the kitchen, we mean. Dr. Melina recommends adding more spices to your cooking routine to help reduce inflammation. Bonus: "They help crank your body's thermostat, firing up your metabolism and in turn burning extra calories and fat," she explains. And just like veggies, spices contain thousands of healthy phytonutrient compounds, including antioxidants, without calories and prep-work. Basically, it's a no-brainer way to get more from your meals. The first one we recommend? Turmeric. Not only does it boost digestion and fight inflammation, but it also fights cancer, wards off heart attacks, and could delay diabetes. Somebody pass us the curry. 
Are you curious to know how nutritious this diet is? The 3 Day Military Diet does provide a variety of foods that contain a range of nutrients. You’ll notice that each day contains a significant amount of protein which is especially helpful while you’re on this low-calorie diet so that you don’t lose muscle or have a metabolism slow-down. In addition, the diet contains a number of vitamin and mineral-packed foods- some of which may surprise you.

The trick here is not only to avoid all obvious sources of carbohydrate (sweets, bread, spaghetti, rice, potatoes), but also to be careful with your protein intake. If you eat large amounts of meat, eggs and the like, the excess protein will be converted into glucose in your body. Large amounts of protein can also raise your insulin levels somewhat. This compromises optimal ketosis.

When the body is expending more energy than it is consuming (e.g. when exercising), the body's cells rely on internally stored energy sources, such as complex carbohydrates and fats, for energy. The first source to which the body turns is glycogen (by glycogenolysis). Glycogen is a complex carbohydrate, 65% of which is stored in skeletal muscles and the remainder in the liver (totaling about 2,000 kcal in the whole body). It is created from the excess of ingested macronutrients, mainly carbohydrates. When glycogen is nearly depleted, the body begins lipolysis, the mobilization and catabolism of fat stores for energy. In this process, fats, obtained from adipose tissue, or fat cells, are broken down into glycerol and fatty acids, which can be used to generate energy.[25] The primary by-products of metabolism are carbon dioxide and water; carbon dioxide is expelled through the respiratory system.

^ Brand-Miller, Janette Cecile; Thomas, M.; Swan, V.; Ahmad, Z.I.; Petocz, P.; Colagiuri, S. (2003). Written at Human Nutrition Unit, School of Molecular and Microbial Biosciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. "Physiological Validation of the Concept of Glycemic Load in Lean Young Adults" (PDF). The Journal of Nutrition. USA (published September 2003). 133 (9): 2728–32. doi:10.1093/jn/133.9.2728. PMID 12949357.
Boredom is dangerous and so easily leads to weight gain. While free time gets perceived as relaxing, it actually makes me feel anxious, which can lead to bad eating habits. My busiest days are the ones when I tend to focus less on my food and more on what I need to get done. That's why I always try to fill my schedule with things that make me feel productive—so I don’t find myself rummaging through the pantry for a lack of something to do.
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