Rachel is a writer, Montessori teacher, and mother, happily living with her family in Guatemala where fresh coffee is always ready. Professionally, she enjoys providing her audiences with thought-provoking articles about health and fitness, early childhood education, and parenting. When she's not busy meeting deadlines, Rachel, a former long-distance runner, still makes fitness and health a priority in her life. She enjoys concocting healthy meals in the kitchen, going for long walks and chasing after her 3 young children.
On the face of it, skipping meals seems like a path to losing weight — if you don’t eat as much, you’ll drop fat. But in practise, it doesn’t work out like that. A 2015 study from Ohio State University found that skipping meals messes up your metabolism and your hormones (specifically insulin), which results in an increased likelihood of abdominal weight gain. Researchers recommended eating several small meals throughout the day as opposed to one or two big ones.
For the first three days, the diet consists of three distinct meal plans. For the first day, breakfast consists of half a grapefruit, a slice of whole-wheat toast with 2 tablespoons of peanut butter, and a cup of caffeinated black tea or coffee. If you can't drink it black, it's recommended you sweeten it with a natural sugar substitute, like Stevia. For lunch, have half a cup of tuna (you can buy 3 oz or 5 oz cannes of cooked tuna, or prepare it yourself), one slice of whole-wheat toast, and a second cup of black coffee or tea. Dinner is the more filling meal, consisting of 3 oz of meat, one cup of green beans, half a banana, one small apple, and one cup of vanilla ice cream for dessert.
The food prescribed in the three-day menu are unusual and not nutrient-dense choices. Foods associated with disease prevention and overall health—such as produce, beans, whole grains, and healthy oils—are greatly lacking or missing completely, yet foods that are associated with increased health risks—like processed meats (hot dogs) and added sugars (a cup of ice cream every night)—are included.

“There are many diet plans on the market today that promote good health,” says Emily Kyle, RDN, who is in private practice in Rochester, New York. “The key is finding one that does not cause you stress or agony.” Ask yourself questions such as: Would the diet guidelines make you happy? Anxious? Stressed? Are you able to follow them long term? “Factors such as enjoyment, flexibility, and longevity should be strongly considered,” adds Kyle.


Enjoy the rich flavor of sweet potatoes? While home on Sundays, cook up a batch. Wrap each one in foil and bake for about an hour at 425 degrees F, or until their luscious, sweet juices start to ooze out into the foil. At work the following week, just pop one in the microwave for a quick warm-up. They’re loaded with taste, so they don’t need any extra toppings. If you want a little zest, swirl in a teaspoon or two of no-salt-added Dijon mustard or a quarter cup of plain nonfat Greek yogurt.
Boredom is dangerous and so easily leads to weight gain. While free time gets perceived as relaxing, it actually makes me feel anxious, which can lead to bad eating habits. My busiest days are the ones when I tend to focus less on my food and more on what I need to get done. That's why I always try to fill my schedule with things that make me feel productive—so I don’t find myself rummaging through the pantry for a lack of something to do.
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