The remaining calories in the keto diet come from protein — about 1 gram (g) per kilogram of body weight, so a 140-pound woman would need about 64 g of protein total. As for carbs: “Every body is different, but most people maintain ketosis with between 20 and 50 g of net carbs per day,” says Mattinson. Total carbohydrates minus fiber equals net carbs, she explains.
Slow down, we're not saying you have diabetes. But insulin resistance is "the beginning of your body not dealing well with sugar and carbohydrates," says Melina Jampolis, M.D., author of The Doctor On Demand Diet..  Basically, when you have insulin resistance, it means the body's cells have noticed an increase in sugar in the blood and ratchet up the amount of insulin to transport it to cells that process it for energy. A vicious cycle gets started, you create more insulin—too much of it, in fact—and your cells become resistant to it, leading to more free-floating sugar in your blood stream that eventually gets converted to fat and is usually stored in your belly. Unless you reverse the insulin resistance, your body will keep going round and round, and diabetes could develop. The key, says Jampolis, is to lose fat and build muscle. "Exercise, especially strength training, can improve your body's response to insulin even if you don't lose an ounce," Jampolis explains. Try lifting weights two to three times a week—these moves are great fat-blasters. 

Although many hypotheses have been put forward to explain how the ketogenic diet works, it remains a mystery. Disproven hypotheses include systemic acidosis (high levels of acid in the blood), electrolyte changes and hypoglycaemia (low blood glucose).[18] Although many biochemical changes are known to occur in the brain of a patient on the ketogenic diet, it is not known which of these has an anticonvulsant effect. The lack of understanding in this area is similar to the situation with many anticonvulsant drugs.[55]
I used to be 100 pounds heavier than I am now. My eating habits were out of control and pretty much the epitome of mindless. I am A.D.D., I have two kids under four, and I work full time, so eating without constant distractions just doesn't happen. But over the years I’ve learned what it takes for me to lose my weight... and most importantly, keep it off.
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