Luckily, exercise can help spur things along when it comes to that pesky stomach fat. “Visceral fat responds well when… [you] start exercising and watching your calories and what you eat,” Harris-Pincus says. And while endless crunches aren’t your ticket to a flat stomach, it is still important to train your ab muscles. “Everything radiates from the center of your body – your balance, your posture, your functional movement,” says Joe Ardito, founder of Fit Crush NYC. “You can perform better when you have a strong core.”

Ketogenic diets are, however, a well-established way to help control Type 2 diabetes, and the plan has for nearly 100 years been used to reduce instances of childhood epileptic seizures. Some scientists also think the high-fat diet may hold promise for staving off Alzheimer's, and there are some early indications it might help improve certain cancer treatment outcomes when used in conjunction with drugs. (Harper is part of a research team investigating how the diet might help boost treatment among people with breast cancer.)
It's so easy to run through the store and grab products blasted with "healthy," "all-natural," "organic,""vegan," or "gluten-free" all over them. But Ilyse Schapiro, M.S., R.D., and Hallie Rich, authors of Should I Scoop Out My Bagel, say that's exactly what could be making the belly bulge stick. "You still must read the nutrition labels because many of these foods can be high in sugar, calories, carbohydrates, and processed ingredients in order to make up for the lack of flavor," says Schapiro.  And unlike the nutrition labels, front-of-the-box packaging is not tightly regulated and monitored. Because it's what you see when you walk down the aisle, research shows that it gives people a "false sense of health" and they fail to understand what leads to obesity and what doesn't. A few tricks to keep in mind: multigrain bread doesn't mean it's 100-percent whole-wheat, and anything "no-sugar-added" is loaded with simple sugars or complex starches that pack on those sneaky pounds. 

Boredom is dangerous and so easily leads to weight gain. While free time gets perceived as relaxing, it actually makes me feel anxious, which can lead to bad eating habits. My busiest days are the ones when I tend to focus less on my food and more on what I need to get done. That's why I always try to fill my schedule with things that make me feel productive—so I don’t find myself rummaging through the pantry for a lack of something to do.
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