For the first three days, the diet consists of three distinct meal plans. For the first day, breakfast consists of half a grapefruit, a slice of whole-wheat toast with 2 tablespoons of peanut butter, and a cup of caffeinated black tea or coffee. If you can't drink it black, it's recommended you sweeten it with a natural sugar substitute, like Stevia. For lunch, have half a cup of tuna (you can buy 3 oz or 5 oz cannes of cooked tuna, or prepare it yourself), one slice of whole-wheat toast, and a second cup of black coffee or tea. Dinner is the more filling meal, consisting of 3 oz of meat, one cup of green beans, half a banana, one small apple, and one cup of vanilla ice cream for dessert.
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While many people turn to artificial sweeteners in a misguided attempt to whittle their waistlines, those fake sugars are likely to have the opposite effect. According to researchers at Yale, artificial sweeteners are actually linked with an increased risk of abdominal obesity and weight gain, possibly because they can trigger cravings for the real stuff and spike insulin levels in a similar fashion to real sugar.
This drug is an injected variant of a satiety hormone called GLP-1. It slows down how quickly the stomach empties and tells the brain that you don’t need to eat yet – a great idea for losing weight. As a bonus this drug works fine while one is on the keto diet and it works even better with intermittent fasting – for a rapid weight loss with no hunger.
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